Cmpt 128 Assignment Submission

2010-2011 Calendar | Computing Science |

Computing Science CMPT Courses

School of Computing Science | Faculty of Applied Sciences
Simon Fraser University Calendar 2010-2011

CMPT XX1-3 Computers and the Activity of People

Concerned with computer literacy and appreciation. What are computers? What do they do? How do they do it? How will they affect us? Illustrations given of applications of computing in the arts, commerce, industry, science and everyday activity. Programming is introduced but not emphasized; instead, students will be exposed to a variety of computer hardware and software elements that are in wide use. No special prerequisite. Students with a grade of B or higher in BC high school computer science 12, or those who have obtained credit for or are currently enrolled in any other Computing Science course may not take CMPT 001 for further credit.

CMPT 100-3 Software Packages and Programming

Introduction to the fundamentals of computer operation and computer programming. The use of software packages is emphasized, focussing on spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. Techniques of solving problems using structured programs in a modern database programming environment are introduced. Prerequisite: BC mathematics 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110. Students with credit for CMPT 102, 120, 126 or 128 may not take CMPT 100 for further credit.

CMPT 102-3 Introduction to Scientific Computer Programming

A programming course which will provide the science student with a working knowledge of a scientific programming language and an introduction to computing concepts, structured programming, and modular design. The student will also gain knowledge in the use of programming environments including the use of numerical algorithm packages. Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 (or 158). Students with credit for CMPT 120, 126 or 128 may not take CMPT 102 for further credit. Quantitative.

CMPT 105W-3 Process, Form, and Convention in Professional Genres

The course teaches fundamentals of informative and persuasive communication for professional engineers and computer scientists in order to assist students in thinking critically about various contemporary technical, social, and ethical issues. It focuses on communicating technical information clearly and concisely, managing issues of persuasion when communicating with diverse audiences, presentation skills, and teamwork. Corequisite: CMPT 106 or ENSC 106. This course is identical to ENSC 105W and students cannot take both for credit. Writing.

CMPT 106-3 Applied Science, Technology and Society

Reviews the different modes of thought characteristic of science, engineering and computing. Examines the histories and chief current research issues in these fields. Considers the ethical and social responsibilities of engineering and computing work. Corequisite: CMPT 105W or ENSC 105W. Students who have taken ENSC 100 cannot take this course for credit. CMPT 106 is identical to ENSC 106 and students cannot take both for credit.

CMPT 110-3 Programming in Visual Basic

Topics will include user interfaces, objects, event-driven programming, program design, and file and data management. Prerequisite: BC mathematics 12 (or equivalent) or any 100 level MATH course. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in a computing science course at the 200 level or higher, or ITEC 240, 241 or 242 may not take CMPT 110 for further credit except with permission of the School of Computing Science. Quantitative.

CMPT 118-3 Special Topics in Computer and Information Technology

Special topics in computing science which are of current interest to non-computing students. The course will be offered from time to time depending on availability of faculty and on student interest. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in a computing science course at the 200 level or higher, may not take CMPT 118 for further credit.

CMPT 120-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming I

An elementary introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students with little or no programming background. Students will learn fundamental concepts and terminology of computing science, acquire elementary skills for programming in a high-level language and be exposed to diverse fields within, and applications of computing science. Topics will include: pseudocode, data types and control structures, fundamental algorithms, computability and complexity, computer architecture, and history of computing science. Treatment is informal and programming is presented as a problem-solving tool. Students should consult with the self-evaluation on the School of Computing Science website to decide whether they should follow the CMPT 120/125 course sequence or enrol in CMPT 126. Prerequisite: BC Math 12 or equivalent is recommended. Students with credit for CMPT 102, 125, 126, 128 or CMPT 200 or higher may not take for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CMPT 125-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming II

A rigorous introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students who already have some backgrounds in computing science and programming. Intended for students who will major in computing science or a related program. Topics include: fundamental algorithms; elements of empirical and theoretical algorithmics; abstract data types and elementary data structures; basic object-oriented programming and software design; computation and computability; specification and program correctness; and history of computing science. Prerequisite: BC MATH 12 (or equivalent) and CMPT 120. Students with credit for CMPT 126, 128 or CMPT 200 or higher may not take for further credit. Quantitative.

CMPT 126-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming

A rigorous introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students who already have substantial programming background. This course provides a condensed version of the two-course sequence of CMPT 120/125, with the primary focus on computing science and object oriented programming. Topics include: fundamental algorithms and problem solving; abstract data types and elementary data structures; basic object-oriented programming and software design; elements of empirical and theoretical algorithmics; computation and computability; specification and program correctness; and history of computing science. Prerequisite: Students with credit for CMPT 125, 128 or CMPT 200 or higher may not take for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CMPT 128-3 Introduction to Computing Science and Programming for Engineers

An introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students wishing to major in Engineering Science or a related program. This course introduces basic computing science concepts, and fundamentals of object oriented programming. Topics include: fundamental algorithms and problem solving; abstract data types and elementary data structures; basic object-oriented programming and software design; elements of empirical and theoretical algorithmics; computation and computability; specification and program correctness; and history of computing science. The course will use a programming language commonly used in Engineering Science. Prerequisite: BC MATH 12 (or equivalent). Students with credit for CMPT 125, 126 or CMPT 200 or higher may not take for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CMPT 150-3 Introduction to Computer Design

Digital design concepts are presented in such a way that students will learn how basic logic blocks of a simple computer are designed. Topics covered include: basic Von Neumann computer architecture; an introduction to assembly language programming; combinational logic design; and sequential logic design. Students who have taken ENSC 150 cannot take for further credit. Prerequisite: Strongly recommended: MACM 101 and either CMPT 120 or equivalent programming. Quantitative.

CMPT 165-3 Introduction to the Internet and the World Wide Web

In this course, we shall examine the structure of the Internet and the World Wide Web as well as design and create web sites. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in a CMPT course at the 200 division or higher, CMPT 118 or 170, or IAT 265 or 267 may not take CMPT 165 for further credit. Breadth-Science.

CMPT 170-3 Introduction to Web Application Development

An introduction to the creation of web pages, as well as interactive websites. Students will learn how to create web pages using current best practices. Creation of web-based application using a modern web application framework. Prerequisite: CMPT 120 or 126 or 128. Enrolling in CMPT 125 concurrently is highly recommended if CMPT 126 or 128 has not already been completed.

CMPT 212-3 Object-Oriented Applications Design in C++

Introduction to object-oriented software design concepts, the object-oriented features of the C++ language, other advanced C++ features, plus a simple introduction to the fundamentals of graphical user interfaces and the development of windowed applications. Prerequisite: CMPT 125, 126 or 128. Recommended: CMPT 225.

CMPT 218-3 Special Topics in Computing Science

Special topics in computing science which are of current interest or are not covered in the regular curriculum will be offered from time to time depending on availability of faculty and on student interest.

CMPT 225-3 Data Structures and Programming

Introduction to a variety of practical and important data structures and methods for implementation and for experimental and analytical evaluation. Topics include: stacks, queues and lists; search trees; hash tables and algorithms; efficient sorting; object-oriented programming; time and space efficiency analysis; and experimental evaluation. Prerequisite: MACM 101 and one of CMPT 125, 126 or 128; or CMPT 128 and approval as a Biomedical Engineering Major. Quantitative.

CMPT 250-3 Introduction to Computer Architecture

This course deals with the main concepts embodied in computer hardware architecture. In particular, the organization, design and limitations of the major building blocks in modern computers is covered in detail. Topics will include: processor organization; control logic design; memory systems; and architectural support for operating systems and programming languages. A hardware description language will be used as a tool to express and work with design concepts. Prerequisite: CMPT/ENSC 150. This course is identical to ENSC 250 and students cannot take both courses for credit. Quantitative.

CMPT 261-3 Spatial Computing

An exploration of the major concepts of analytical and computational geometry and an introduction to tools for programming geometric information and displaying the results. Students completing this course will have a basic understanding of how computer graphics systems work; skills in writing programs to display geometric information for graphics display; ability to solve geometric problems using transformations, geometric representations and the basic algorithms of computational geometry; and familiarity with various common mathematical notation for representing spatial objects. Prerequisite: CMPT 125, 126, or 128. MATH 232.

CMPT 265-3 Multimedia Programming for Art and Design

Using cases from topics such as animation, cinema, music and design, this course introduces a variety of programming tools and techniques. Practical use of multimedia scripting languages and authoring environments is covered in the context of a series of composition and design projects. Code libraries and programming techniques for specific media will be introduced. Assessment will be based on both programming and the expressive use of programs in their case context. Prerequisite: CMPT 120 (or equivalent first programming course). Students with credit for IART 206, 207 and 208 may not take this course for further credit. CMPT 265 and IAT 265 are identical courses; at most one may be taken for credit.

CMPT 267-3 Introduction to Technological Systems

Introduction to the core technologies and systems used in media-rich interactive environments, including computer hardware, operating systems, input and output technologies, networking and media. The concepts will be examined by working in a high-level media programming environment. This course is equivalent to IAT 267; students with credit for IAT 267 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have obtained credit for, or are currently enrolled in, a computing science course at the 300 division or higher, or are approved computing science major or honors students may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: CMPT 120 (or equivalent first programming course).

CMPT 275-4 Software Engineering I

Introduction to software engineering techniques used in analysis/design and in software project management. The course centres on a team project involving requirements gathering, object analysis and simple data normalization, use-case-driven user documentation and design followed by implementation and testing. Additionally, there is an introduction to project planning, metrics, quality assurance, configuration management, and people issues. Prerequisite: CMPT 225, MACM 101, MATH 151, one W course. MATH 154 or 157 with a grade of at least B+ may be substituted for MATH 151. Cannot receive credit for both CMPT 276 and CMPT 275.

CMPT 276-3 Introduction to Software Engineering

An overview of various techniques used for software development and software project management. Major tasks and phases in modern software development, including requirements, analysis, documentation, design, implementation, testing, installation, support, and maintenance. Project management issues are also introduced. Prerequisite: One W course, CMPT 225, MACM 101, MATH 151. MATH 154/157 with at least B+ may substitute for MATH 151. Cannot receive credit for both CMPT 275 and CMPT 276.

CMPT 300-3 Operating Systems I

This course aims to give the student an understanding of what a modern operating system is, and the services it provides. It also discusses some basic issues in operating systems and provides solutions. Topics include multiprogramming, process management, memory management, and file systems. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 and MACM 101.

CMPT 301-3 Information Systems Management

Topics include strategic planning and use of information systems, current ad future technologies, technology assimilation, organizational learning, end-user computing, managing projects and people, managing production operations and networks, evaluating performance and benefits, crisis management and disaster recovery, security and control, financial accountability, and proactive management techniques for a changing environment. Prerequisite: CMPT 225.

CMPT 305-3 Computer Simulation and Modeling

This course is an introduction to the modelling, analysis, and computer simulation of complex systems. Topics include analytic modelling, discrete event simulation, experimental design, random number generation, and statistical analysis. Prerequisite: CMPT 225, MACM 101, STAT 270.

CMPT 307-3 Data Structures and Algorithms

Analysis and design of data structures for lists, sets, trees, dictionaries, and priority queues. A selection of topics chosen from sorting, memory management, graphs and graph algorithms. Prerequisite: CMPT 225, MACM 201, MATH 151, and MATH 232 or 240.

CMPT 308-3 Computability and Complexity

This course introduces students to formal models of computations such as Turing machines and RAMs. Notions of tractability and intractability are discusses both with respect to computability and resource requirements. The relationship of these concepts to logic is also covered. Prerequisite: MACM 201.

CMPT 310-3 Artificial Intelligence Survey

Provides a unified discussion of the fundamental approaches to the problems in artificial intelligence. The topics considered are: representational typology and search methods; game playing, heuristic programming; pattern recognition and classification; theorem-proving; question-answering systems; natural language understanding; computer vision. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 and MACM 101.

CMPT 318-3 Special Topics in Computing Science

Special topics in computing science at the 300 level. Topics that are of current interest or are not covered in regular curriculum will be offered from time to time depending on availability of faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT 225.

CMPT 320-3 Social Implications - Computerized Society

An examination of social processes that are being automated and implications for good and evil, that may be entailed in the automation of procedures by which goods and services are allocated. Examination of what are dehumanizing and humanizing parts of systems and how systems can be designed to have a humanizing effect. Prerequisite: A CMPT course and 45 units. Breadth-Science.

CMPT 322W-3 Professional Responsibility and Ethics

The theory and practice of computer ethics. The basis for ethical decision-making and the methodology for reaching ethical decisions concerning computing matters will be studied. Writing as a means to understand and reason about complex ethical issues will be emphasized. Prerequisite: three CMPT units, 30 total units, and any lower division W course. Writing.

CMPT 340-3 Biomedical Computing

The principles involved in using computers for data acquisition, real-time processing, pattern recognition and experimental control in biology and medicine will be developed. The use of large data bases and simulation will be explored. Prerequisite: Completion of 60 units including CMPT 125, 126 or 128 (or 102 with a grade of B or higher).

CMPT 354-3 Database Systems I

Logical representations of data records. Data models. Studies of some popular file and database systems. Document retrieval. Other related issues such as database administration, data dictionary and security. Prerequisite: CMPT 225, MACM 101.

CMPT 361-3 Introduction to Computer Graphics

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of computer graphics. Topics include graphics display and interaction hardware, basic algorithms for 2D primitives, anti-aliasing, 2D and 3D geometrical transformations, 3D projections/viewing, Polygonal and hierarchical models, hidden-surface removal, basic rendering techniques (color, shading, raytracing, radiosity), and interaction techniques. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 and MATH 232 or 240.

CMPT 363-3 User Interface Design

This course provides a comprehensive study of user interface design. Topics include: goals and principles of UI design (systems engineering and human factors), historical perspective, current paradigms (widget-based, mental model, graphic design, ergonomics, metaphor, constructivist/iterative approach, and visual languages) and their evaluation, existing tools and packages (dialogue models, event-based systems, prototyping), future paradigms, and the social impact of UI. Prerequisite: CMPT 225.

CMPT 365-3 Multimedia Systems

Multimedia systems design, multimedia hardware and software, issues in effectively representing, processing, and retrieving multimedia data such as text, graphics, sound and music, image and video. Prerequisite: CMPT 225.

CMPT 370-3 Information System Design

This course focuses on the computer-related problems of information system design and procedures of design implementation. Well-established design methodologies will be discussed, and case studies will be used to illustrate various techniques of system design. Prerequisite: CMPT 275 or 276; CMPT 354.

CMPT 371-3 Data Communications and Networking

Data communication fundamentals (data types, rates, and transmission media). Network architectures for local and wide areas. Communications protocols suitable for various architectures. ISO protocols and internetworking. Performance analysis under various loadings and channel error rates. Prerequisite: CMPT 225, CMPT/ENSC 150 and MATH 151. MATH 154 or 157 with a grade of at least B+ may be substituted for MATH 151.

CMPT 373-3 Software Development Methods

Survey of modern software development methodology. Several software development process models will be examined, as will the general principles behind such models. Provides experience with different programming paradigms and their advantages and disadvantages during software development. Prerequisite: CMPT 276 or 275.

CMPT 375-3 Mathematical Foundations of Software Technology

Abstraction principles and formalization techniques for modeling software systems in early design phases. Design is a creative activity calling for abstract models that facilitate reasoning about the key system attributes to ensure that these attributes are properly established prior to actually building a system. The focus is on specification and validation techniques rather than on formal verification. Prerequisite: MACM 101, 201. Recommended: CMPT 275.

CMPT 376W-3 Technical Writing and Group Dynamics

Covers professional writing in computing science, including format conventions and technical reports. Examines group dynamics, including team leadership, dispute resolution and collaborative writing. Also covers research methods. Prerequisite: Any lower-division W course. Co-requisite: CMPT 275. Writing.

CMPT 379-3 Principles of Compiler Design

This course covers the key components of a compiler for a high level programming language. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing, type checking, code generation and optimization. Students will work in teams to design and implement an actual compiler making use of tools such as lex and yacc. Prerequisite: MACM 201, CMPT 150 and 225.

CMPT 383-3 Comparative Programming Languages

Various concepts and principles underlying the design and use of modern programming languages are considered in the context of procedural, object-oriented, functional and logic programming languages. Topics include data and control structuring constructs, facilities for modularity and data abstraction, polymorphism, syntax, and formal semantics. Prerequisite: CMPT 225, MACM 101.

CMPT 384-3 Symbolic Computing

This course considers modelling and programming techniques appropriate for symbolic data domains such as mathematical expressions, logical formulas, grammars and programming languages. Topics include recursive and functional programming style, grammar-based data abstraction, simplification and reduction transformations, conversions to canonical form, environment data structures and interpreters, metaprogramming, pattern matching and theorem proving. Prerequisite: CMPT 225; MACM 101.

CMPT 401-3 Operating Systems II

Advanced concepts in modern operating systems such as scheduling algorithms, address space protection, virtual memory, multiprocessor operating systems, microkernels, virtual machine hypervisors, embedded and real-time operating systems. Students will implement parts of an operating system. Prerequisite: CMPT 150 and 300.

CMPT 404-3 Cryptography and Cryptographic Protocols

The main cryptographic tools and primitives, their use in cryptographic applications; security and weaknesses of the current protocols. The notion of security, standard encryption schemes, digital signatures, zero-knowledge, selected other topics. Prerequisite: MACM 201. CMPT 307 and 308 are recommended.

CMPT 405-3 Design and Analysis of Computing Algorithms

Models of computation, methods of algorithm design; complexity of algorithms; algorithms on graphs, NP-completeness, approximation algorithms, selected topics. Prerequisite: CMPT 307.

CMPT 406-3 Computational Geometry

Mathematical preliminaries; convex hull algorithms; intersection problems; closest-point problems and their applications. Prerequisite: CMPT 307.

CMPT 407-3 Computational Complexity

Machine models and their equivalences, complexity classes, separation theorems, reductions, Cook's theorem, NP-completeness, the polynomial time hierarchy, boolean circuit models and parallel complexity theory, other topics of interest to the students and instructor. Prerequisite: CMPT 307.

CMPT 408-3 Theory of Computing Networks/Communications

Network design parameters and goals, dynamic networks and permutations, routing in direct networks, structured communication in direct networks, other topics of interest to the students and instructor. Prerequisite: CMPT 307 and 371.

CMPT 409-3 Special Topics in Theoretical Computing Science

Current topics in theoretical computing science depending on faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT 307.

CMPT 411-3 Knowledge Representation

Formal and foundational issues dealing with the representation of knowledge in artificial intelligence systems are covered. Questions of semantics, incompleteness, non-monotonicity and others will be examined. As well, particular approaches, such as procedural or semantic network, may be discussed. Prerequisite: completion of nine units in Computing Science upper division courses or, in exceptional cases, permission of the instructor.

CMPT 412-3 Computational Vision

Computational approaches to image understanding will be discussed in relation to theories about the operation of the human visual system and with respect to practical applications in robotics. Topics will include edge detection, shape from shading, stereopsis, optical flow, Fourier methods, gradient space, three-dimensional object representation and constraint satisfaction. Prerequisite: MATH 152, and nine units in Computing upper division courses or permission of the instructor.

CMPT 413-3 Computational Linguistics

This course examines the theoretical and applied problems of constructing and modelling systems, which aim to extract and represent the meaning of natural language sentences or of whole discourses, but drawing on contributions from the fields of linguistics, cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence and computing science. Prerequisite: completion of nine units in Computing Science upper division courses or, in exceptional cases, permission of the instructor.

CMPT 414-3 Model-Based Computer Vision

This course covers various topics in computer vision with the emphasis on the model-based approach. Main subjects include 2-D and 3-D representations, matching, constraint relaxation, model-based vision systems. State-of-the-art robot vision systems will be used extensively as study cases. The solid modelling and CAD aspects of this course should also interest students of computer graphics. Prerequisite: MATH 152 and nine units in CMPT upper division courses, or permission of the instructor.

CMPT 415-3 Special Research Projects

To be individually arranged.

CMPT 416-3 Special Research Projects

To be individually arranged.

CMPT 417-3 Intelligent Systems

Intelligent Systems using modern constraint programming and heuristic search methods. A survey of this rapidly advancing technology as applied to scheduling, planning, design and configuration. An introduction to constraint programming, heuristic search, constructive (backtrack) search, iterative improvement (local) search, mixed-initiative systems and combinatorial optimization. Prerequisite: CMPT 225.

CMPT 418-3 Computational Cognitive Architecture

Computationally-oriented theories of human cognitive architecture are explored, beginning with neurologically inspired (neural network) models of "low-level" brain processes, and progressing upwards to higher-level symbolic processing, of the kind that occurs in rule-following and problem solving. Arguments concerning the need for modular processing and combinatorially adequate forms of mental representation are examined at length. Prerequisite: CMPT 225. Recommended: CMPT 310.

CMPT 419-3 Special Topics in Artificial Intelligence

Current topics in artificial intelligence depending on faculty and student interest.

CMPT 426-3 Practicum I

First term of work experience in the School of Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: students must complete Bridging Online (visit www.sfu.ca/coop/bol for further details) at least two terms before their anticipated co-op placement. Students must then enrol with the co-op program by the second week of the term preceding the work term. Normally, students will have completed a minimum of 45 units by the end of the term of application, CMPT 275 or 276, and have a minimum CGPA of 2.50. Graded as pass/fail (P/F).

CMPT 427-3 Practicum II

The second term of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: CMPT 426, CGPA of 2.50. Graded as pass/fail (P/F).

CMPT 428-3 Practicum III

The third term of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: CMPT 427, CGPA of 2.50. Graded as pass/fail (P/F).

CMPT 429-3 Practicum IV

The fourth term of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: CMPT 428, CGPA of 2.50. Graded as pass/fail (P/F).

CMPT 430-3 Practicum V

An optional fifth term of work experience for students in the Computing Science Co-operative Education Program. Units from this course do not count towards the units required for an SFU degree. Prerequisite: CMPT 429, CGPA of 2.50. Graded as pass/fail (P/F).

CMPT 431-3 Distributed Systems

An introduction to distributed systems: systems consisting of multiple physical components connected over a network. Architectures of such systems, ranging from client-server to peer-to-peer. Distributed systems are analyzed via case studies of real network file systems, replicated systems, sensor networks and peer-to-peer systems. Hands-on experience designing and implementing a complex distributed system. Prerequisite: CMPT 300, 371. Students who have taken CMPT 401 before September 2008 may not take this course for further credit.

CMPT 432-3 Real-time Systems

The design and implementation of real-time systems. Techniques for specifying system timing requirements and determining if these requirements are met. Different models for the design of real-time schedulers are examined and analyzed. The design of real-time operating systems and their role in supporting real-time systems are also studied. Prerequisite: CMPT 250, 300.

CMPT 433-3 Embedded Systems

The basics of embedded system organization, hardware-software co-design, and programmable chip technologies are studied. Formal models and specification languages for capturing and analyzing the behavior of embedded systems. The design and use of tools for system partitioning and hardware/software co-design implementation, validation, and verification are also studied. Prerequisite: CMPT 250, 300.

CMPT 441-3 Computational Biology

This course introduces students to the computing science principles underlying computational biology. The emphasis is on the design, analysis and implementation of computational techniques. Possible topics include algorithms for sequence alignment, database searching, gene finding, phylogeny and structure analysis. Prerequisite: CMPT 307. Students with credit for CMPT 341 may not take this course for further credit.

CMPT 454-3 Database Systems II

An advanced course on database systems which covers crash recovery, concurrency control, transaction processing, distributed database systems as the core material and a set of selected topics based on the new developments and research interests, such as object-oriented data models and systems, extended relational systems, deductive database systems, and security and integrity. Prerequisite: CMPT 300 and 354.

CMPT 456-3 Information Retrieval and Web Search

Introduction to the essentials of information retrieval and the applications of information retrieval in web search and web information systems. Topics include the major models of information retrieval, similarity search, text content search, link structures and web graphics, web mining and applications, = crawling, search engines, and some advanced topics such as spam detection, online advertisement, and fraud detection in online auctions. Prerequisite: CMPT 354.

CMPT 459-3 Special Topics in Database Systems

Current topics in database and information systems depending on faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT 354.

CMPT 461-3 Image Synthesis

Covers advanced topics and techniques in computer graphics with a focus on image synthesis. Topics include photorealistic rendering, advanced ray tracing, Monte Carlo methods, photon maps, radiosity, light fields, participating media, as well as tone reproduction. Prerequisite: CMPT 361, MACM 201 and 316. Students with credit for CMPT 451 may not take CMPT 461 for further credit.

CMPT 464-3 Geometric Modeling in Computer Graphics

Covers advanced topics in geometric modeling and processing for computer graphics, such as Bezier and B-spline techniques, subdivision curves and surfaces, solid modeling, implicit representation, surface reconstruction, multi-resolution modeling, digital geometry processing (e.g. mesh smoothing, compression, and parameterization), point-based representation, and procedural modeling. Prerequisite: CMPT 361, MACM 316. Students with credit for CMPT 469 between 2003 and 2007 or equivalent may not take CMPT 464 for further credit.

CMPT 466-3 Animation

Topics and techniques in animation, including: The history of animation, computers in animation, traditional animation approaches, and computer animation techniques such as geometric modelling, interpolation, camera controls, kinematics, dynamics, constraint-based animation, realistic motion, temporal aliasing, digital effects and post production. Prerequisite: CMPT 361 and MACM 316 or permission of the instructor.

CMPT 467-3 Visualization

Presents advanced topics in the field of scientific and information visualization. Topics include an introduction to visualization (importance, basic approaches, and existing tools), abstract visualization concepts, human perception, visualization methodology, data representation, 2D and 3D display, interactive visualization, and their use in medical, scientific, and business applications. Prerequisite: CMPT 361, MACM 316.

CMPT 468-3 Introduction to Computer Music and Sound Synthesis

An introduction to the fundamentals of digital audio, computer music, basic sound synthesis algorithms, and digital audio effects and processing. Topics include concepts of sound and digital audio representation, basic concepts of digital filtering, fundamentals of spectrum analysis, and sound synthesis techniques. Understanding of theoretical concepts will be consolidated through practical programming assignments in Matlab, however there will also be exposure to various freeware real-time audio programming and sound editing environments. Prerequisite: MATH 152 and one of CMPT 125, 126 or 128 (or permission of instructor).

CMPT 469-3 Special Topics in Computer Graphics

Current topics in computer graphics depending on faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT 361.

CMPT 470-3 Web-based Information Systems

This course examines: two-tier/multi-tier client/server architectures; the architecture of a Web-based information system; web servers/browser; programming/scripting tools for clients and servers; database access; transport of programming objects; messaging systems; security; and applications (such as e-commerce and on-line learning). Prerequisite: CMPT 354.

CMPT 471-3 Networking II

This course covers the fundamentals of higher level network functionality such as remote procedure/object calls, name/address resolution, network file systems, network security and high speed connectivity/bridging/switching. Prerequisite: CMPT 300 and 371.

CMPT 473-3 Software Quality Assurance

Factors in software quality include functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Techniques for assessing the quality of software with respect to such factors, and methods for improving the quality of both software products and software development processes. Prerequisite: CMPT 373.

CMPT 474-3 Web Systems Architecture

Web service based systems are fundamentally different from traditional software systems. The conceptual and methodological differences between a standard software development process and the development of a web service based information system. The technology involved during the construction of their own web service based application in an extensive project. Prerequisite: CMPT 371.

CMPT 475-3 Software Engineering II

Students will study in-depth the techniques, tools and standards needed in the management of software development. Topics will include software process and quality standards, life cycle models, requirements specification issues, project estimation, planning and tracking, project management tools, team dynamics and management, configuration and change management techniques and tools, metrics, quality assurance and test techniques, professional and legal issues. Prerequisite: CMPT 275 or 276 and 15 units of upper division courses. Recommended: co-op experience. Students with credit for CMPT 373 may not take this course for further credit.

CMPT 477-3 Introduction to Formal Verification

Introduces, at an accessible level, a formal framework for symbolic model checking, one of the most important verification methods. The techniques are illustrated with examples of verification of reactive systems and communication protocols. Students learn to work with a model checking tool. Prerequisite: CMPT 275 or 276.

CMPT 479-3 Special Topics in Computing Systems

Current topics in computing systems depending on faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT 401.

CMPT 481-3 Functional Programming

The functional style of programming will be examined in the context of a modern functional language such as Haskell. Topics will include lazy evaluation and infinite data structures, higher order functions, pattern matching, program transformation and verification, and polymorphic types. Prerequisite: CMPT 383.

CMPT 489-3 Special Topics in Programming Language

Current topics in programming languages depending on faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT 383.

CMPT 496-3 Directed Studies

Independent study in topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor(s) that are not covered by existing course offerings. Students must submit a proposal to the undergraduate chair, including the name and signature of the supervising faculty member(s). The proposal must include details of the material to be covered and the work to be submitted. Prerequisite: students must have completed 90 units, including 15 units of upper division CMPT courses, and have a GPA of at least 3.00. The proposal must be submitted to the undergraduate chair at least 15 days in advance of the term. The proposal must be signed by the supervisor(s) and the undergraduate chair.

CMPT 497-6 Dual Degree Program Capstone Project

Students will select one project to be completed in their final year of study. Each student must complete a project report and make a project presentation. The project may include: a research survey, a project implementation, a research paper/report. Prerequisite: Students must be in their final year of the Dual Degree Program.

CMPT 498-6 Honors Research Project

Students must submit a proposal to the Undergraduate Chair, including the name and signature of the supervising faculty member(s). Students must complete a project report and make a project presentation. This course can satisfy the research project requirements for Computing Science honors students. Prerequisite: students must have completed 90 units, including 15 units of upper division CMPT courses, and have a GPA of at least 3.00. The proposal must be submitted to the Undergraduate Chair at least 15 days in advance of the term. The proposal must be signed by the supervisor(s) and the undergraduate chair.

CMPT 499-3 Special Topics in Computer Hardware

Current topics in computer hardware depending on faculty and student interest. Prerequisite: CMPT/ENSC 250.

CMPT 505-3 Problem Based Learning in Bioinformatics

The problem-based learning course will develop students' ability to exchange ideas in small groups focused on real but simplified problems in bioinformatics. Problems will be carefully selected to cover all aspects of bioinformatics research. Prerequisites: enrolled in Graduate Diploma in Bioinformatics. This course is identical to MBB 505 and students can not take both courses for credit.

CMPT 506-3 Critical Research Analysis

Advanced seminar series for bioinformatics. Prerequisites: Enrolment in Graduate Diploma in Bioinformatics. This course is identical to MBB 506 and students can not take both courses for credit.

CMPT 601-5 Computing Science Education I

This course will introduce graduate students in Education to the basics of computing science. Emphasis will be placed on the use of microcomputers. Topics will be programming microcomputers; file handling; microcomputer hardware; word processing; graphics; social, economic and legal implications. Prerequisite: graduate status in education. If the student has an adequate background in computing, this course must be replaced by other computing science undergraduate or graduate courses.

CMPT 602-5 Computing Science Education II

This course introduces some formal topics in Computing Science to the graduate student in education. Topics include discrete mathematical structures; models of computing; data structures; formal languages and algorithms. Also, methods will be introduced for the design and implementation of large programs using structured modular design. Prerequisite: CMPT 601 or consent of instructor(s).

CMPT 611-6 Research Rotation I

One term of original bioinformatics research conducted in the lab of a designated mentor. Students are required to write their results in a scientific journal format and defend these results before a panel consisting of the project mentor plus two other qualified faculty members. Prerequisite: enrolment in Graduate Diploma in Bioinformatics. This course is identical to MBB 611 and students can not take both courses for credit.

CMPT 612-6 Research Rotation II

One term of original bioinformatics research conducted in the lab of a designated mentor. Students are required to write their results in a scientific journal format and defend these results before a panel consisting of the project mentor plus two other qualified faculty members. Prerequisites: enrolment in Graduate Diploma in Bioinformatics. This course is identical to MBB 612 and students can not receive credit for both courses.

CMPT 613-6 Research Rotation III

One term of original bioinformatics research conducted in the lab of a designated mentor. Students are required to write their results in a scientific journal format and defend these results before a panel consisting of the project mentor plus two other qualified faculty members. Prerequisites: enrolment in Graduate Diploma in Bioinformatics. This course is identical to MBB 613 and student can not receive credit for both courses.

CMPT 701-3 Computability and Logic

Deep connections between logic and computation have been evident since early work in both areas. More recently, logic-based methods have led to important progress in diverse areas of computing science. This course will provide a foundation in logic and computability suitable for students who wish to understand the application of logic in various areas of CS, or as preparation for more advanced study in logic or theoretical CS.

CMPT 705-3 Design and Analysis of Algorithms

The objective of this course is to expose students to basic techniques in algorithm design and analysis. Topics will include greedy algorithms, dynamic programming, advanced data structures, network flows, randomized algorithms.

CMPT 710-3 Computational Complexity

This course provides a broad view of theoretical computing science with an emphasis on complexity theory. Topics will include a review of formal models of computation, language classes, and basic complexity theory; design and analysis of efficient algorithms; survey of structural complexity including complexity hierarchies, NP-completeness, and oracles; approximation techniques for discrete problems.

CMPT 711-3 Bioinformatics Algorithms

Fundamental algorithmic techniques used to solve computational problems encountered in molecular biology. This area is usually referred to as Bioinformatics or Computational Biology. Students who have taken CMPT 881 (Bioinformatics) in 2007 or earlier may not take CMPT 711 for further credit.

CMPT 721-3 Knowledge Representation and Reasoning

Knowledge representation is the area of Artificial Intelligence concerned with how knowledge can be represented symbolically and manipulated by reasoning programs. This course addresses problems dealing with the design of languages for representing knowledge, the formal interpretation of these languages and the design of computational mechanisms for making inferences. Since much of Artificial Intelligence requires the specification of a large body of domain-specific knowledge, this area lies at the core of AI. Prerequisites: CMPT 310/710 recommended. Cross-listed course with CMPT 411.

CMPT 725-3 Logical Methods in Computational Intelligence

Provides an overview and in-depth introduction on several new developments in computational logic for intelligent systems. In particular, we shall cover three areas of strategic importance: natural language processing, abductive logic programming and constraint-based logic programming. The purpose is to introduce graduate students to the frontiers of computational logic research and applications. Students of various backgrounds, such as Linguistics and Cognitive Sciences, are most welcome. Some of the course will proceed in seminar style. Students should be prepared to read and present papers and to participate in discussions.

CMPT 726-3 Machine Learning

Machine Learning is the study of computer algorithms that improve automatically through experience. Provides students who conduct research in machine learning, or use it in their research, with a grounding in both the theoretical justification for, and practical application of, machine learning algorithms. Covers techniques in supervised and unsupervised learning, the graphical model formalism, and algorithms for combining models. Students who have taken CMPT 882 (Machine Learning) in 2007 or earlier may not take CMPT 726 for further credit.

CMPT 730-3 Programming Languages

This course will cover basic concepts in the area of programming languages. The course will be largely of a theoretical nature and will concentrate on fundamental concepts of lasting importance, rather than topics of current interest.

CMPT 731-3 Functional Programming

This course will cover functional programming including introduction to a functional programming language, program transformation and verification, implementation of functional programming languages, and other selected topics which may include parallel evaluation of functional programs, analysis of performance, and advanced applications. Students who have taken CMPT 831 may not take this course for further credit.

CMPT 740-3 Database Systems

Introduction to advanced database system concepts, including query processing, transaction processing, distributed and heterogeneous databases, object-oriented and object-relational databases, data mining and data warehousing, spatial and multimedia systems and Internet information systems.

CMPT 741-3 Data Mining

The student will learn basic concepts and techniques of data mining. Unlike data management required in traditional database applications, data analysis aims to extract useful patterns, trends and knowledge from raw data for decision support. Such information are implicit in the data and must be mined to be useful.

CMPT 745-3 Software Engineering

This course examines fundamental principles of software engineering and state-of-the-art techniques for improving the quality of software designs. With an emphasis on methodological aspects and mathematical foundations, the specification, design and test of concurrent and reactive systems is addressed in depth. Students learn how to use formal techniques as a practical tool for the analysis and validation of key system properties in early design stages. Applications focus on high level design of distributed and embedded systems.

CMPT 755-3 Compiler Theory

Precedence, LL(k), LR(k) grammars; SLR(k), LALR(k), L(m)R(k) parsing techniques; transduction grammars; general compiler organization, code generation and optimization; memory allocation for object programs; garbage collection. Students who have taken CMPT 830 may not take this course for further credit.

CMPT 760-3 Operating Systems

This course will discuss design issues relating to the functionality and performance of modern workstation operating systems, such as methods for sharing memory, file and data objects, and choice of communication protocols. The special needs of high performance multiprocessor systems and real time systems will also be addressed.

CMPT 761-3 Image Synthesis

Advanced topics and techniques in computer graphics with a focus on image synthesis are covered. Topics include photorealistic rendering, advanced ray tracing, Monte Carlo methods, photon maps, radiosity, light fields, participating media, as well as tone reproduction. Students with credit for CMPT 461, CMPT 770, or equivalent may not take CMPT 761 for further credit.

CMPT 764-3 Geometric Modeling in Computer Graphics

Advanced topics in geometric modeling and processing for computer graphics, such as Bezier and B-spline techniques, subdivision curves and surfaces, solid modeling, implicit representation, surface reconstruction, multi-resolution modeling, digital geometry processing (e.g., mesh smoothing, compression, and parameterization), point-based representation, and procedural modeling. Prerequisite: CMPT 361, MACM 316. Students with credit for CMPT 464 or equivalent may not take CMPT 764 for further credit.

CMPT 765-3 Computer Communication Network

This course will cover the fundamentals and recent advances in computer communication networks. The emphasis will be on the design and analysis of networks, especially switching, routing, and network topology.

CMPT 767-3 Visualization

Advanced topics in the field of scientific and information visualization are presented. Topics may include: an introduction to visualization (importance, basic approaches and existing tools), abstract visualization concepts, human perception, visualization methodology, 2D and 3D display and interaction and their use in medical, scientific, and business applications. Prerequisite: CMPT 316, 461 or equivalent (by permission of instructor). Students who have taken CMPT 878 or 775 may not take this course for further credit.

CMPT 768-3 Computer Music Theory and Sound Synthesis

Introduces the fundamentals of digital audio signal processing, with applications to computer music and sound analysis/synthesis. Students who have taken CMPT 468 cannot take this course for additional credit.

CMPT 771-3 Internet Architecture and Protocols

Investigates the design and operation of the global network of networks: the Internet. This course studies the structure of the Internet and the TCP/IP protocol suit that enables it to scale to millions of hosts. The focus is on design principles, performance modeling, and services offered by the Internet.

CMPT 773-3 User Interface Design

This course provides an overview of a number of research areas in human-computer interaction. Topics may include: overview of HCI (historical/intellectual, GUI, case studies), interactive systems (design, evaluation, software development), interaction methods (vision, graphic design, touch, speech, etc.), human factors (information processing, capabilities), research frontiers (computer supported co-operative work, intelligent systems, hypertext, multimedia, virtual reality, cyberspace). Recommended: CMPT 363 or equivalent (instructor discretion). Students who have taken CMPT 873 may not take this course for further credit.

CMPT 777-3 Formal Verification

The goal of formal verification is to prove correctness or to find mistakes in software and other systems. This course introduces, at an accessible level, a formal framework for symbolic model checking, one of the most important verification methods. The techniques are illustrated with examples of verification of reactive systems and communication protocols. Students learn to work with a model checking tool such as NuSMV.

CMPT 813-3 Computational Geometry

This course covers recent developments in discrete, combinatorial, and algorithmic geometry. Emphasis is placed on both developing general geometric techniques and solving specific problems. Open problems and applications will be discussed.

CMPT 814-3 Algorithmic Graph Theory

Algorithm design often stresses universal approaches for general problem instances. If the instances possess a special structure, more efficient algorithms are possible. This course will examine graphs and networks with special structure, such as chordal, interval, and permutation graphs, which allows the development of efficient algorithms for hard computational problems.

CMPT 815-3 Algorithms of Optimization

This course will cover a variety of optimization models, that naturally arise in the area of management science and operations research, which can be formulated as mathematical programming problems.

CMPT 816-3 Theory of Communication Networks

This course investigates the design, classification, modelling, analysis, and efficient use of communication networks such as telephone networks, interconnection networks in parallel processing systems, and special-purpose networks.

CMPT 820-3 Multimedia Systems

This seminar course covers current research in the field of multimedia computing. Topics include multimedia data representation, compression, retrieval, network communications and multimedia systems. Computing science graduate student or permission of instructor.

CMPT 821-3 Robot Vision

This course discusses issues and research results pertinent to robot vision. Topics include depth recovery for robot navigation, three dimensional object recognition and scene analysis, model-based approaches, parallel vision machines and algorithms, and case studies of contemporary robot vision systems.

CMPT 822-3 Computational Vision

A seminar based on the artificial intelligence approach to vision. Computational vision has the goal of discovering the algorithms and heuristics which allow a two dimensional array of light intensities to be interpreted as a three dimensional scene. By reading and discussing research papers - starting with the original work on the analysis of line drawings, and ending with the most recent work in the field - participants begin to develop a general overview of computational vision, and an understanding of the current research problems.

CMPT 823-3 Formal Topics - Knowledge Representation

This course surveys current research in formal aspects of knowledge representation. Topics covered in the course will centre on various features and characteristics of encodings of knowledge, including incomplete knowledge, non monotonic reasoning, inexact and imprecise reasoning, meta-reasoning, etc. Suggested preparation: a course in formal logic and a previous course in artificial intelligence.

CMPT 825-3 Natural Language Processing

In this course, theoretical and applied issues related to the development of natural language processing systems and specific applications are examined. Investigations into parsing issues, different computational linguistic formalisms, natural language syntax, semantics, and discourse related phenomena will be considered and an actual natural language processor will be developed.

CMPT 826-3 Automated Learning and Reasoning

This course covers topics shared both by AI and cognitive science. Current AI research papers are examined from the perspective of cognitive science, and vice versa. Topics covered in a given term will vary, depending upon the instructor, but most of the following topics will be addressed in any given term: connectionist models of intelligence; 'human-like' automated deduction; reasoning by analogy; topics in natural language; automated concept learning; and computational approaches to semantics. Prerequisite: at least one graduate or undergraduate AI course, or instructor's permission.

CMPT 827-3 Intelligent Systems

Intelligent systems are knowledge-based computer programs which emulate the reasoning abilities of human experts. This introductory course will analyze the underlying artificial intelligence methodology and survey advances in rule-based systems, constraint solving, incremental reasoning, intelligent backtracking and heuristic local search methods. We will look specifically at research applications in intelligent scheduling, configuration and planning. The course is intended for graduate students with a reasonable background in symbolic programming.

CMPT 828-3 Illumination in Images and Video

Explores current research in the field of imaging, computer vision, and smart cameras that aims at identifying, eliminating, and re-lighting the effects of illumination in natural scenes. One salient direction in this research is the identification and elimination of shadows in imagery. The topics touched on in the endeavour include physics-based image understanding, image processing, and information theory. Students in vision and in graphics should be interested in the material in this course.

CMPT 829-3 Special Topics in Bioinformatics

Examination of recent literature and problems in bioinformatics. Within the CIHR graduate bioinformatics training program, this course will be offered alternatively as the problem-based learning course and the advanced graduate seminar in bioinformatics (both concurrent with MBB 829). Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

CMPT 842-3 Concurrency Control in Database Systems

Transactions, recoverability, serializability theory, schedulers, locking, timestamping, optimistic schedulers, multiversion database systems; recovery, commit protocols, termination protocols; replicated database systems, quorum based concurrency control; distributed snapshot taking, distributed deadlock detection, reliable storage systems; concurrency control in object oriented database systems.

CMPT 843-3 Database and Knowledge-base Systems

An advanced course on database systems which focuses on data mining and data warehousing, including their principles, designs, implementations, and applications. It may cover some additional topics on advanced database system concepts, including deductive and object-oriented database systems, spatial and multimedia databases, and database-oriented Web technology.

CMPT 852-3 VLSI Systems Design

This course links two fields that traditionally have been considered two separate entities: computer architecture and integrated circuit design. The vehicle used to demonstrate the interaction of layout issues and architectural concepts is metal oxide semiconductor technology.

CMPT 880-3 Special Topics in Computing Science

This course aims to give students experience to emerging important areas of computing science. Prerequisite: instructor discretion.

CMPT 881-3 Special Topics in Theoretical Computing Science

CMPT 882-3 Special Topics in Artificial Intelligence

CMPT 884-3 Special Topics in Database Systems

CMPT 885-3 Special Topics in Computer Architecture

CMPT 886-3 Special Topics in Operating Systems

CMPT 888-3 Special Topics in Computer Graphics, HCI, Vision and Visualization

Examines current research topics in computer graphics, human computer interaction (including audio), computer vision and visualization.

CMPT 889-3 Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Computing

CMPT 894-3 Directed Reading

CMPT 896-0 MSc Course Option Extended Document

Required for students registered in the MSc course option. Students may only register for this course during the semester in which he/she registers for his/her 10th course.

CMPT 897-6 MSc Project

CMPT 898-6 MSc Thesis

CMPT 899-6 PhD Thesis

Return to computing science index page.

Presentation on theme: "CMPT 128: Introduction to Computing Science for Engineering Students"— Presentation transcript:

0 CMPT 128 Introduction to Computing Science for Engineering Students
Course Organization

1 CMPT 128: Introduction to Computing Science for Engineering Students
Monday, Wednesday, FridayD100: 12:30-13: D200: 15:30-16:20Textbook:Problem Solving with C++,Walter Savitch, Addison-Wesley, 2012, 9th EditionAdditional References:The C++ Programming Language, third edition, Bjarne Stroustrop, Addision Wesley, 1997:Not easy to read, but this is the definitive C++ reference.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

2 Class web-siteAll the information discussed today and more can always be found on the class web-siteYou have received an containing this addressCourse Central is also a useful link to abundant information useful to students taking a computing science course© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

3 Class web-siteYou can also find links to the class web-site by going toMore useful information for students can be found at© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

4 © Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept. 2007 -2012

5 CMPT 128 Home Page© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

6 Your Teaching Assistants
© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

7 CMPT 128 Website© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

8 My availability© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

9 CMPT 128 Home Page© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

10 Evaluation© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

11 Exceptions to Grading rules
In order to obtain a clear pass (C- or better) you MUSTHave a combined score on the Lab Quizzes and Midterm Quizzes (weighted as indicated on the previous slide) that exceeds 50% (36/72)Have a combined score on lab reports and assignments (weighted as on the previous slide) that exceeds 50% (12/24)© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

12 Dates of Quizzes© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

13 In lecture Midterm Quizzes
Practice midterm quiz Sept. 29Midterm quiz Oct. 17TO RECEIVE A GRADE YOU MUST WRITE QUIZZES IN THE SECTION (LECTURE TIME) YOU OFFICIALLY REGISTERED INNO EXCEPTIONS© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

14 In lab quizzesDuring two of your scheduled lab periods a lab quiz will be given. You will be asked to answer one or two programming questions based on material covered in previous labsYou will be asked to write code that demonstrates your understanding of the concepts practiced in the preceding labs.You will be given 100 minutes to write your code.Your answer will be graded out of 50© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

15 Assignments Two assignments
Each assignment is worth 8% of your course gradeProblems similar to parts of the assignments may appear on the midterms and the final.Assignments will combine many concepts learned in lectures and the labs© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

16 Final Exam One 3 hour final examination 50% short answer problems
50% longer problems that utilize several important concepts and require integration of those concepts. Will Include coding (written on paper)A sample exam, including solutions, will be posted two weeks before the final exam© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

17 Labs Each lab includes two lab problems There will be no labs
In the first week of classes (Sept. 2-5)In the week of November 11Each lab includes two lab problemsFor the first lab you will receive full points for successfully submitting the lab solutionsFor 2 labs you will submit a lab report that will be gradedComplete solutions of all labs will be posted.Lab report solutions will be posted© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

18 Lab participation / attendance
Lab participation points (you may earn >1.5%)Participation in some labs, awarded by TA’s and instructor ( 0.38% good, 0.75% outstanding)AEP 1%Lab attendance points (you may earn > 1.5% )Attendance in same labsSign in at start of lab, Sign out at end of lab (0.38% per lab)Weeks when there are quizzes or midterms in the lab you will not be able to earn participation or attendance points© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

19 Assignments, Labs, Solutions
© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

20 Important Dates© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

21 Return, Grading questions
Marked work will be returned as soon as possible (1-2 weeks from the due date of the work)You must review your work and the grading when you received the marked work. You have 1 week from the return date to review and submit any questions about grading.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

22 AssignmentsAt least two weeks before the due date the assignment will be posted on the websiteAssignments will require you to combine and use many concepts and tools you have learnedAssignments will be much more demanding than lab problems or practice problemsComplete solutions to all assignments will be postedInformation of proper preparation of assignments and lab problems is available on the class website.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

23 LabsOn or before Saturday of each week Lab problems will be posted for the next week.Lab Problems are to be completed individually or in a small group (up to five students in the same lab section)Collaboration within your groups is encouragedComplete solutions to all problems will be postedLab reports should be written individually© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

24 Grading Information Assignments and Lab Reports (and code) should be:
submitted electronically using the course management systemBonus points (5%) are available for submitting assignments or lab reports more than 48 hours earlyNo late assignments or lab problems will be acceptedUnofficial grades will be available on the course management systemhttps://courses.cs.sfu.ca/© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

25 Required Readings, Notes
© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

26 Readings and Notes© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

27 Academic Honesty© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

28 Academic Honesty Read the policy
© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

29 Information about the class
Be sure to check your SFU account regularlyregarding the class will be sent to your Campus mail Account, so check it regularly© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

30 Computing Science Instructional Labs (CSIL)
The CSIL is available for your use at all times beginning in the second week of classes.Either ASB 9838 or ASB 9840 or ASB9700 will be availableIf there is a lab for another course in one or more of these rooms the other will be availableAt particular times the instructor and/or TAs will be available in the lab (ASB 9838) to answer your questions.Instructor and TAs:Tuesday 8:30-12:30Thursday 8:30 – 4:30© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

31 Finding CSIL labs: 1© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

32 Finding CSIL labs: 2 CSIL Labs
© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

33 http://www. sfu. ca/computing/about/school-facilities/access-card
© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

34 Access to CSIL CSIL is protected by a security card access system
As a student in a computing science course you are eligible to have a security access card for CSILIf you are pre-registered your access card may be picked up from the card office at traffic and security (there is a refundable deposit and a processing fee)© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

35 CSIL RulesBefore you can use any of the computers in the CSIL you shouldRead the policies governing the use of CSILThese policies can be found on the CMPT web site (see following slides)When you log in you will be asked to confirm that you agree to abide by these policies© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

36 IMPORTANTRead the Policies© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

37 Getting Started in CSIL
Before you try programming in CSIL read the information provided for youRead the general information pagesBrowse the FAQs,Now you are ready to startYour CSIL computer ID and password and the ID an password you use for your SFU account.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

38 Labs and using CSIL Computers in CSIL are available 24/7
Labs for many classes are scheduled in CSILWhen a lab (not your own) is scheduled in one of the CSIL areas you are requested to work in another area of CSIL. The schedule showing which areas are in use can be found at© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

39 Required Lab Hours Attendance at Lab hours is required
Lab Hours are held in the Windows area of CSIL labsLab Hours provide an opportunity to work with others sharing knowledge and experience.Lab Hours give you an opportunity to ask the instructor or TA one on one questions about problems and assignments.Lab Hours help you learn the required concepts one by one and allow you to ask questions to assure you understand each one.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

40 Reading Assignment Visit and read the information on the class website
Be sure you can findPosted notesReading assignments for each lectureAssignment due datesInstructions on using the CSIL labsInstructions on using your own computer for assignmentsHave any questions ready for next lecture© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

41 CMPT 128 Introduction to Computing Science for Engineering Students
Computer Components

42 Hardware and SoftwareA computer is a machine designed to perform operations specified with a set of instructions called a program.Hardware refers to the computer equipment.Peripheral Input devices: keyboard, mouse,Peripheral Output devices: screen, disk, DVD, printerProcessing/storage devices: cpu, RAM, ROM, DVDSoftware refers to the programs that describe the steps we want the computer to perform.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

43 Computer Hardware CPU – ALU – ROM – RAM – Central processing unit
Arithmetic and logic unitROM –Read only memoryRAM –Random access memoryInternalMemoryExternalMemoryCPUInputDevices?ProcessorOutputDevices?ALUCache/Memory© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

44 Central Processing Unit (CPU, ALU)
Performs arithmeticThe processor adds, subtracts, multiplies and divides binary numbers using the Arithmetic Logic Unit, ALUMakes comparisonsThe processor can check if two “numbers” are equal, and determine if one is “larger” or “smaller” than the otherMoves bits (binary digits)Knows how to access any RAM (or ROM) addressCan copy data to or from any memory address and its own onboard memory© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

45 Information storage Primary Storage: RAM, ROM
requires power to store informationSecondary Storage: Disk, DVD, thumb drives, SD cards …Less expensive (so more plentiful)Information persists even without powerStores information that is loaded into primary storage (like programs and data) to be used© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

46 Example: Command Line UI
Windows Command Prompt© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

47 Example: Graphical UI (GUI)
Windows explorer© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

48 Computer Software: Applications
Application Software (Software Tools)Word processors (Microsoft Word, WordPerfect, ...)Spreadsheet programs (Excel, Lotus1-2-3, ...)Computer gamesCommunication software ( , chat, web browser…)Telecommunication software (VOIP, …)Programming environments (Visual Studio, Eclipse)OTHERS?© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

49 Computer Software: Languages
Some Computer LanguagesMachine language (machine instruction set)assembly languagehigh level languagesC, C++, Ada, Fortran, Basic, JavaDo YOU know of any others?mathematical computation and symbolic manipulation tools (MATLAB, Mathematica, ...)Application software is written using computer languages.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

50 Machine languageEach type of processor (like i7, Pentium 4, Athalon, Z80, …) has its own instruction setEach instruction in an instruction set does a single thing like access a piece of data, add two pieces of data, compare two pieces of data …Each instruction is represented by a unique number This # may be different for different instruction sets, but no two instructions in the same instruction set will have the same #© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

51 Machine Language programs
In machine language a program is a list of instructionsEach instruction is represented by a numberInside the memory of the computer each number is represented in binary (as a constant length string of 1’s and 0’s)The long string of 0’s and 1’s is easy for the computer to understand and very difficult for a Human to read or write© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

52 Assembler Assembler languages make it easier for the programmer.
Assembler is easier for humans to read/writeThe numbers that identify each of the instructions in the instruction set are replaced with mnemonics like ADD, CMP, …The code, written using these mnemonics is written into a text file.© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

53 Assembler ProgramsThe code for an Assembler program is written into a text file.The computer read 1’s and 0’s not textHow do we translate to machine readable form?A computer program called a compiler is used to translate the text file (called a source file) containing the assembler code into machine readable codeThe compiler writes a binary file containing the machine readable code (called an object file)© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

54 Programs in High Level Languages
Assembler is easier to read/write than machine language. It is still very cumbersomeHigh level languages are easier to write than assemblerThe compiler is more complex, but that is a tool you use, not one you writeIn this course we will learn the language C++Many ideas we will discuss in this course are equally applicable to C++ or to any other compiled high level language (C, Fortran, …)© Janice Regan, CMPT 128, Sept

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